The application process for The Prototyping Grant 2019 has now been closed.

Archive for February, 2019

Commercialisation Opportunities of Microfluidics as Miniaturized Wearable Devices

Commercialisation Opportunities of Microfluidics as Miniaturized Wearable Devices

Microfluidic technology is based on devices capable of handling micro to picolitre amounts of samples, and their applications are diverse ranging from pharmaceuticals, healthcare to the chemical industry. As this technology is being embraced across industries and academic fields, its market value has been steadily increasing into a billion-dollar value. To understand the current and the future market of microfluidics the origin of these “micro-plumbing” devices must be reviewed. Microfluidic technology can first be found in analytic methods such as gas-phase chromatography (GPC), high-pressure liquid (HPLC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) driven by technological demands in breakthroughs in molecular biology in the 1980s such as genomics and DNA sequencing1. (more…)

Being Able to Build Human Blood Vessels as Organoids from Stem Cells is a Game Changer

Being Able to Build Human Blood Vessels as Organoids from Stem Cells is a Game Changer

The more that is learned about how microfluidic processes control or contribute to cellular change, the sooner science will be able to design a cost-effective medical treatment based on that information. New research on microtubules and blood-vessel organoids augments this.

Recent findings by a team of engineering and medical scientists at Stanford University shed new light on how cell components move around and self-renew. Part of the study’s focus was on the link between microtubules and self-organization. (more…)